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wellness-vaccines

Whether you have a new puppy or kitten, a “senior citizen,” or any age in between, wellness examinations provide an excellent opportunity for us to conduct a thorough examination. This information will help us identify medical problems and any other issues that can affect your pet’s health and quality of life.

During a wellness visit Smithfield Animal Hospital's staff will ask questions about your pet’s behavior, appetite, exercise habits, and regular activities at home. We can make recommendations at that time for routine diagnostic testing and vaccinations. If your pet seems healthy, a wellness exam is a good opportunity to note any changes, such as weight gain or loss or other subtle changes that may not be evident at home.

A wellness examination is also your chance to have us address your questions or concerns about your pet. No question is too small or too silly. We strive to help you understand your pet’s health.

A physical exam is vital to your pet's health care, but there are many conditions that cannot be detected by looking, listening or touching your pet. Annual blood work may be recommended to evaluate your pet’s major organ. By assessing kidney, liver, and pancreatic levels our doctors may detect early signs of illness and address health issues before they progress.

Wellness examinations help us establish a relationship with you and your pet. Through your pet’s physical examinations, other wellness procedures, and our consultations with you, we get to know your pet and learn about his or her lifestyle, personality, health risks, home environment, and other important information. We encourage you to use wellness examinations to take an active role in your pet’s health care.

Vaccines:

Many vaccines are available for use in dogs and cats, but not every pet needs every available vaccine. Some vaccines are considered core vaccines and should be administered to all pets, whereas other vaccines are optional and may be recommended for pets based on a variety of factors, such as their risk for exposure to disease. Vaccine recommendations can also change throughout a pet’s life, as travel habits and other variables change. Smithfield Animal Hospital will consider all these factors as we determine which vaccines your pet should have.

Vaccines help pets live longer, healthier lives. Protecting your pet is our primary goal, so developing an appropriate vaccine schedule for your pet is important to us. Call us at (757)357-9308 today to set up an appointment to discuss your pet’s vaccination needs.



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Office Hours

Monday:

8:00 AM-6:00 PM

Tuesday:

8:00 AM-6:00 PM

Wednesday:

8:00 AM-6:00 PM

Thursday:

8:00 AM-6:00 PM

Friday:

8:00 AM-6:00 PM

Saturday:

8:00 AM-12:00 PM

Sunday:

Closed

Location

Testimonials

  • "I took my 12 week old puppy in today and was very impressed with the care given to him. The ladies at the front desk were so friendly and welcoming. The vet answered all of my questions, was patient, and really seemed to care about my puppy. Having been to another clinic in the area, I was pleased with not only the care, but also the value. Thanks for the excellent service."
    Colleen W.
  • "Mr Boo Boo loves all his friends at SAH.. They take really good care of him."
    Brenda M.

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